The Sophos Brand Guide

Identity

Cybersecurity is complicated and at times overwhelming. Why would anyone make it more difficult? At Sophos we are devoted to removing the superfluous, the superficial, and the complex to provide clarity. We’ve carefully selected each aspect of our visual identity: colors, fonts, icons, and imagery to organize and optimize communication. Why? Because we all have the right to understand the security protecting us in a vast cyber world.

'S' Shield

The ‘S’ Shield is a graphic representation of our company but it should not replace the Sophos logo in a single piece of communication. As such we are able to use and manipulate it to create assets to help communicate our message, from background elements to Partner conference branding. But consideration should always be used in how the icon is manipulated to retain its consistency with the Sophos brand.

  • The integrity of the ‘S’ and shield must remain.
  • Don’t manipulate the ‘S’ separate from the ‘Shield’
  • When manipulating the icon, consider it existing in a 3D space and thus would adhere to proportions and perspective.
  • Don’t add addtional elements to the icon.
  • Don’t outline the icon.

Colors

Using color in a consistent way reinforces our brand. The distinctive vibrant colors play a major role in establishing our identity and should be implemented consistently in all web applications, print communications, and presentations, as well as in a broad range of marketing materials.

Primary

Secondary

Typography

Sophos typographic identity is visible across many applications, including print, electronic, and environmental displays. The following type selections have been made to best represent the voice of Sophos and to maintain a consistent tone throughout various communications.

Headline

Sophos Sans Semibold
Headline = X pt size
Leading = 95-100% X point size
Track -10
Kern to perfection
Left align left

Spacing

> or = to the x height of headline

Subheadline

Sophos Sans Medium
50% of headline pt size
Leading 110% of subheadline point size
Track -15
Kern as needed
Align left

Digital

H1 Heading

Sophos Sans Semibold
Size 64 px
Line height 64 px
Track -1.5 px

The best defense
is the best defense.

H2 Heading

Sophos Sans Semibold
Size 46 px
Line height 46 px
Track -.75 px

Sophos evolves to meet every new challenge.

H3 Heading

Sophos Sans Medium
Size 26 px
Line height 30 px
Track -.5 px

Sophos evolves to meet every new challenge, protecting more than 400,000 organizations.

H3 Strong

Sophos Sans Semibold
Size 26 px
Line height 30 px
Track -.25 px

Sophos evolves to meet every new challenge, protecting more than 400,000 organizations.

Paragraph

Sophos Sans Regular
Size 18 px
Line height 24 px
Track 0 px
Paragraph Spacing 10 px

Sophos evolves to meet every new challenge, protecting more than 400,000 organizations of all sizes in more than 150 countries from today’s most advanced cyber threats.

Powered by SophosLabs, our cloud-native and AI-enhanced solutions are able to adapt and evolve to secure endpoints and networks against never-before-seen cybercriminal tactics and techniques.

Inset

Sophos Sans Regular
Size 12 px
Line height 15 px
Track 0 px

Sophos evolves to meet every new challenge, protecting more than 400,000 organizations of all sizes in more than 150 countries from today’s most advanced cyber threats. Powered by SophosLabs, our cloud-native and AI-enhanced solutions are able to adapt and evolve to secure endpoints and networks against never-before-seen cybercriminal tactics and techniques.

Product Icons

These icons represent the core Sophos products. Black, white, or Sophos Blue are the recommended color to be applied when possible. Icons must be used in tandem with the their coordinating product title.

Product Icons

  • Do not change or alter, color, proportion, design, or removal of any element.
  • Do not distort appearance.
  • Do not compress, stretch, distort, or rotate the icon.
  • Don’t add additional elements to the icon.
  • Don’t outline the icon.
  • Icons must not be combined with any other object, including other logos, graphics, photos, design features, or symbols.

Sophos Cloud

Sophos Cloud

Sophos Email

Sophos Email

Sophos Encryption

Sophos Encryption

Sophos Endpoint

Sophos Endpoint

Sophos Endpoint Detection and Response

Sophos Endpoint Detection and Response

Sophos Factory

Sophos Factory

Sophos Firewall

Sophos Firewall

Sophos Managed Threat Response

Sophos Managed Threat Response

Sophos Mobile

Sophos Mobile

Sophos Phish Threat

Sophos Phish Threat

Sophos Professional Services

Sophos Professional Services

Sophos Rapid Response

Sophos Rapid Response

Sophos Switch

Sophos Switch

Sophos Web

Sophos Web

Sophos Wireless

Sophos Wireless

Sophos Workload Protection

Sophos Workload Protection

Sophos XDR

Sophos XDR

Sophos Zero Trust Network Access

Sophos Zero Trust Network Access

Sophos Central

Sophos Central

Product Tiles

  • Do not change or alter, color, proportion, design, or removal of any element.
  • Do not distort appearance.
  • Do not compress, stretch, distort, or rotate the tile.
  • Don’t add additional elements to the tile.
  • Don’t outline the icon.
  • Tiles must not be combined with any other object, including other logos, graphics, photos, design features, or symbols other than the specific product image associated with the product.

Product Images

Photography

Devices

Sophos does not sell laptops or monitors. To better emphasize our products, both software and hardware, all other devices are to be toned to better blend with the backgound. The devices should be similar in color as the background within the layout–blue, black or white. The content on screen is always in complete color.

Video

Intro/Outro

Titles & Translation

Illustration

Coming Soon

Voice

The frontline I.T. warrior’s job is difficult and complex. At Sophos we strive to uncomplicate the world of cybersecurity by using humor, insight, direct and concise language. We’re here to help and if we use the same old platitudes as other security providers... well, that’s just not helpful at all.

Tone

We write for an international audience and must keep a consistent style, despite differences between regions. For global communications (especially the website and corporate blog), our style defaults to U.S. spellings.

Our style is based on AP Style. For all style inquiries, refer this guide first and then the AP Stylebook.

If you are writing for the U.K. or other regions where U.K. spellings are used, local language may be used in regional communications only.

Corporate Descriptions

25 Words

Sophos evolves to meet every new challenge, protecting more than 400,000 organizations of all sizes in more than 150 countries from today’s most advanced cyber threats.

50 Words

Sophos evolves to meet every new challenge, protecting more than 400,000 organizations of all sizes in more than 150 countries from today’s most advanced cyber threats. Powered by SophosLabs, our cloud-native and AI-enhanced solutions are able to adapt and evolve to secure endpoints and networks against never-before-seen cybercriminal tactics and techniques.

100 Words

Sophos evolves to meet every new challenge, protecting more than 400,000 organizations of all sizes in more than 150 countries from today’s most advanced cyber threats. Powered by SophosLabs, our cloud-native and AI-enhanced solutions are able to adapt and evolve to secure endpoints and networks against never-before-seen cybercriminal tactics and techniques. Managed through our award-winning, cloud-based platform, Sophos Central, our best-of-breed products work together through our unique Synchronized Security system to share threat intelligence and respond to evolving threats. The Sophos suite of products secures networks and endpoints against automated and active-adversary breaches, ransomware, malware, exploits, data exfiltration, phishing, and more.

Product Naming

To help establish the Sophos brand and it’s products requires consistent application across all communications. The name of the each product is to be used as seen below. Do NOT omit ‘Sophos’ before the name i.e. MTR, Endpoint, ZTNA etc.

Sophos Cloud

Sophos Email

Sophos Encryption

Sophos Endpoint

Sophos Endpoint Detection and Response

Sophos Factory

Sophos Firewall

Sophos MTR

or Sophos Managed Threat Response

Sophos Mobile

Sophos Phish Threat

Sophos Professional Services

Sophos Rapid Response

Sophos Switch

Sophos Web

Sophos Wireless

Sophos Workload Protection

Sophos XDR

or Sophos Extend Detection and Response

Sophos ZTNA

or Sophos Zero Trust Network Access

Spelling

Do Write

Do NOT Write

airplane

aeroplane

aluminum

aluminium

analog

analogue

analyze

analyse

behavior

behaviour

behoove

behove

caliber

calibre

catalog

catalogue

center

centre

color

colour

coupe

coupé

cross-sell

crosssell

cybercrime

cyber-crime

cybersecurity

cyber-security

defense

defence

honor

honour

liter

litre

mid-market

midmarket

more

thanover

neighbor

neighbour

organize

organise

realize

realise

recognize

recognise

upsell

up-sell

enduser and network business units

endpoint and network technology

Next-generation/next-gen or “the next generation of”

synchronized security

Security Heartbeat

Style Guide

Abbreviations

Define abbreviations (e.g., AWS, EXE, PDF) the first time you use it in a document.

  • Example: Active Directory (AD) is a Microsoft technology. AD is used by …

You do not need to define the abbreviation if it is commonly used (e.g., USB, UTM, OS).

Do not use periods in abbreviations (e.g., IT, not I.T.).

The exception is when abbreviating countries (e.g., U.K. and U.S.).

Acronyms

Acronyms we pronounce as words are written in lowercase, unless at the start of a sentence (e.g., laser, sonar, scuba).

For less common and technical acronyms, write them in capitals (e.g., CD-ROM, WYSIWYG interface, GNOME environment).

You can make abbreviations plural by adding a lowercase "s" without an apostrophe, (e.g., PDFs, CD-ROMs). For indefinite articles (“a” or “an”) before an acronym, choose the one you would use when pronouncing the acronym.

  • Examples: an FTP server (“an eff-tee-pee server”), an OS (“an oh-ess”); a UTM (“a yoo-tee-em”).

Apostrophes

Apostrophes are used to show possession (e.g., the customer’s complaint, the company’s future). If the owner is plural, the apostrophe usually comes after the "s" (e.g., the customers’ complaints, the companies’ future, etc.). If the plural doesn’t end in an "s," treat it as a singular (e.g., the women’s committee, the people’s choice).

Two situations can cause problems:

Ordinary plurals (plurals of a single word) don’t need apostrophes. We sell apple’s and pear’s is wrong.

It’s or its? It’s means it is or it has, (contraction). Its means belonging to it, (e.g., the company is confident about its future). Its’ is never right.

Avoid using the possessive form of Sophos (say “our”). When you need to use it, use Sophos’ and not Sophos’s.

Bold

Use bold sparingly to emphasize words, numbers, and dates.

Bold italic

Bold italic makes text hard to read, so stick with bold.

Bullet points

When creating a list of bullet points, do not use a period at the end of the sentence.

Capitalization

Only capitalize proper names (e.g., product names, headlines, etc.) or at the beginning of the sentence.

Commas

When listing a series of elements, include a comma before the and/or.

  • Example: The final decision was among a Jeep, a Mazda, and a Nissan.

This is called the serial comma, also known as the Oxford comma.

Contractions

Contractions shorten two words by adding an apostrophe like it’s or isn’t. Use contractions unless you’re writing something formal. You don’t have to use them all the time. Read it out loud to make sure it sounds natural and flows properly.

Dates

Use this format for dates:

September 15, 2010

If you’re using dates in a table, it’s fine to abbreviate the month (e.g., Sept. 15, 2008).

For decades, talk about the 1990s or ‘90s, never the 1990’s.

Communications that will remain strictly regional should use the local format.

Ellipses

Ellipses ( ... ) always have a space before and after.

Em Dash (—)

Em dashes may replace commas, semicolons, colons, and parentheses to indicate added emphasis, an interruption, or an abrupt change of thought. An em dash has a space before and after it.

  • Example: Our antivirus zaps spyware and adware — and it wins awards. Our solution is easy to manage so you can focus on what’s important — your business.

Fractions

Write fractions out in full and hyphenate them, (e.g., three-quarters, one-and-a-half). Set decimal fractions as figures, (e.g., 3.14, 84.9).

Graphs

When you’re presenting numbers in a graph, use numerals, (e.g., 1,2,3).

Headlines

Headlines may be written as complete or incomplete sentences. Complete sentences should be written in Sentence case and include punctuation.

  • Example: How does ransomware get to your data?

Incomplete sentences should be written in Title Case without punctuation.

  • Example: Sophos Rapid Response

Hyphens

Use hyphens to make compound words, (e.g., full-disk encryption).

Sometimes you’ll need to use them to avoid confusion: A third world war is different from a third-world war. Full-disk encryption is different from full disk encryption.

If you’re not sure, look it up in the dictionary.

Italics

Avoid using italics. They make writing look cluttered.

Italic case is harder to read than normal copy and should be used sparingly.

Bold and italic at the same time is difficult to read and should not be used.

Italics should also be used when you’re talking about publications, TV/radio programs, films, shows, and ships:

  • Huckleberry Finn
  • Star Wars
  • The New York Times
  • USS Theodore Roosevelt

Money

For amounts of money, use the symbol for the units of currency without a space:

  • US$123.45 (U.S. dollars)
  • CDN$123.45 (Canadian dollars)
  • €1,234.56 (Euro)

If you need to explain what the unit price is, say in cents or in dollars.

Names

The first time you mention someone, give their full name. Then call them by their first name. (e.g., Kris Hagerman is the CEO of Sophos. Kris says; Bruce Schneier is the world’s most prominent cryptographer. Bruce says ... ).

Numbers

To write out numbers, use words for one to nine and use numbers for 10 and above. Don’t mix the two in the same sentence, (e.g., I’ll write again in four days. I’ll write again in 12 days. I’ll write again in 4 days and in 12 days).

If you’re talking about measurements or adding numbers to a graph or table, always use numbers:

  • 5 cm, 70 mph, 6 hr 17 min, £4 billion

For large numbers, separate the digits with a comma:

  • 1,234
  • 1,234,567
  • 1,234,567.89

If it’s a whole number, you don’t need to write .00 after it.

Parentheses

Use parentheses (like this), not brackets [like this]. If you’re putting a whole sentence into parentheses, put the period inside too. (This is a full sentence in parentheses, so it has its full stop inside.) If you’re only putting part of a sentence inside the parentheses, then you need to put the period outside.

Percentages

In text, always write out “percent” in full (e.g.,: 16 percent growth). In a graph or chart “%” may be used.

Phone numbers

Make domestic U.S. phone numbers easier to read by adding a hyphen between each block and starting with a “+”: +1-866-866-2802. For numbers in other countries, use a space instead of a hyphen and always include an international calling code. You’ll also need to insert the area code’s 0 in parentheses:

  • +44 (0) 1235 559 933

Places

Places take an initial capital: Boston, Paris, New York.

Use lowercase for compass bearings and don’t hyphenate them, (e.g., north, southeast, northwest). The only time you’d capitalize them is for well-established names for regions and areas like the South (of the U.S.), the Pacific Northwest, Southeast Asia, etc.

Quotations

If you’re quoting direct speech, use double quotation marks introduced with a comma.

  • Example: Kate Libby said, “This is good news for our customer.” She added, “It will also increase our sales.”

Punctuation goes inside the quotes.

If there’s a quote within a quote, use single quotation marks within double quotation marks.

  • Example: Richard Gill said, “That’s what the report meant by ‘The clear and obvious choice’.”

It’s very rare to need to do this, but if you’re quoting someone in a headline then use single quotation marks.

  • Example: New computer system ‘best ever’ – report

Use quotation marks to provide a gentle emphasis. Words in quotes will stand out as important when someone reads what you’ve written, but they won’t stand out at a glance like bold.

Sophos

Sophos is always singular.

  • Example: Sophos is trusted by 100 million users.

Never say Sophos are.

Than or then?

Than relates to comparison, while then relates to time, particularly sequential order, or step-by-step instructions.

  • Example:
  • Attacks are more sophisticated than we’ve seen before. (Comparison)
  • Insert the disc, then follow prompts. (Sequential time)

Their, they’re, or there?

Use their when you’re talking about something that belongs to them. Use they’re as a contraction of they are. Use there to mean a specific place.

  • Example: They’re leaving all their packages over there.

Times

We use a.m. and p.m., not AM/PM or am/pm. Do not include :00 for the top of the hour:

  • 3 p.m. not 3:00 p.m.
  • 3:30 p.m., etc.
  • 12 noon or 12 midnight and
  • 12 p.m. / 12 a.m. are both acceptable depending on the situation

Note: We default to the 12-hour clock, and to American date structure for worldwide copy. It is perfectly acceptable to use regional style (for example: 0930, 2230) for localized copy however.

Trademarks

Sophos owned trademarks should be referenced in the first instance, but not afterwards.

Underline

Don’t underline words to make them stand out.

URLs: In Print

You don’t need to preface a web address with http://. Only write out the network protocol if it’s something else like https:// or ftp://.

In body copy, it helps mark out the fact that it’s a URL if you preface it with www.

We also offer 24-hour technical support at www.sophos.com/support/.

For advertising and marketing communications, you can omit the ‘www.’ to save space.

  • Example: Visit sophos.com today.

We also have a number of vanity URLs available for use with advertising and marketing materials, (e.g., sophos.com/endpoint, sophos.com/data, sophos.com/mobile, etc). To look up or request a vanity URL, email website@sophos.com.

Do not use initial capitals in web addresses (sophos.com not Sophos.com; facebook.com not Facebook.com).

We

It’s more personal to talk about us and we, rather than talking about Sophos.

Because we’re such a big company, make sure people know exactly who we are; is it your team, your business, or the whole company? If your context doesn’t make it clear, make sure to explain it to your reader.

But because we want to sound like a team of people, open and understanding, we frequently use we.

  • Example:
  • We are changing the way people think about digital security worldwide.

Your or you’re?

Use your when you talk about something that belongs to your reader. Use you’re as a contraction of you are.

  • Example: You’re about to make your first payment.

Vocabulary

!

Never use exclamation marks.

&

Avoid using ampersands outside brand names, trademarks, formal titles, or in logotypes, (e.g., Ogilvy & Mather, Standard & Poor).

%

Use % when dealing with numerals. Use "percent" when the numbers are written out.

  • Example: 5%. 10%. The stock is up five percent on the month.

24/7

Not 24x7

24/7/365

32 bit, 64 bit

No hyphens

affect

Verb, to influence

Effect - verb, to cause; noun, result

a lot

Two words

among

Among introduces more than two items, between introduces two items.

  • Example: The funds were divided among Ford, Carter, and McCarthy.

anti-spam

anti-malware

Hyphenated

antivirus

One word. Do not use AV as an abbreviation.

apps

appliance

Sophos appliances (but Sophos Email Appliance/Sophos Web Appliance)

auto-update

back end

  • Example: The new back end is great.

back-end

  • Example: The back-end processor is powerful.

-based

  • Example: PC-based

BlackBerry, BlackBerrys

Not BlackBerries or Blackberry

Blackhat

blacklist

Use in preference to block list.

cellphone

co-branded

complimentary

A compliment, with an i, is a kind or flattering remark. If a friend says he likes your new shoes, he’s giving you a compliment.

  • Example: The CEO complimented the staff on their efforts. He made complimentary remarks about their recent work.

complementary

A complement, with an e, is a full crew or a set, and when something complements something else, it means they go well together. You might talk about a picture frame that complements a photo or the crew complement needed to operate a ship.

  • Example: Enjoy the complementary drinks.
  • Sophos Clean complements Sophos Endpoint Protection.

coordinate

cybercrime

cybercriminal

cybersecurity

cyberthreat

day zero

Use zero day (no caps, hyphen if adjective); do not use 0-day.

data center

Two words

data loss

Not data leakage

datasheet

One word

DDoS

desk aid

Two words

dial-up

Distributed denial-of-service attack

DOS

double-click

dropdown

ecard

No hyphen or caps

ecommerce

effect

See affect

e.g.

Write e.g. in lowercase and follow it with a comma. When giving an example, use e.g.

Use i.e. if you need to give further explanation (i.e., to explain a point you’ve made already in more depth).

email

One word, no hyphen

end user

Noun

end-user

Adjective

endpoint

Enterprise Manager

Not EM

etc.

Write in lowercase and always follow it with a period

  • Example: Serial, parallel, USB, IEEE 1394, etc.

every day

Not everyday, unless as an adjective

  • Example: Everyday occurrences happen every day.

Facebook

Capitalize

failover

fake antivirus

Not Fake AV, not fake anti-virus

false negative

false positive

farther

Use farther to talk about distance, and use further to talk about time or amount.

  • Example: Paris is farther north than Barcelona. (Distance)
  • This year, we’re further along in the development cycle. (Time)

fewer

Use less when you’re talking about things you can’t count individually; use fewer with objects you can count one-by-one.

  • Example: There were fewer attacks this month.
  • There was less activity in the first half of the year.

filename

focused, focusing

One ‘s’

four-color process

Not 4-color process

full-strength

If preceding a noun

further

See farther

front end

Noun

front-end

Adjective

  • Example: front-end interface

FTP

genotype

healthcare

help desk

Use as two words

  • Example: Call the help desk for further information.

home page

HTTP

IDE

IP

IT

Not I.T.

i.e.

Use it if you need to give further explanation (i.e., to explain a point you’ve made already in more depth). Write i.e. in lowercase and follow it with a comma. To give an example, use e.g. instead.

inbox

InterCheck technology

internet

No capitalization

intranet

kernel-mode

Adjective

keyword

knowledgebase

One word

  • Example: Sophos support knowledgebase

left-hand

Adjective; not left hand

less

See fewer

licence

Noun (U.K./AU)

license

Verb (U.K./AU); noun and verb (U.S.)

licensee

All countries

licensing

All countries

Linux

Ltd./ Inc.

Use abbreviation always. Don’t use Limited.

  • Example: Sophos Ltd.

Mac/Macintosh

Not MAC

Mac OS X

Not OSX

macro

message box

mid-size business

Use mid-size business, not medium-sized business

more than

Use “more than” to discuss numbers, never “over”

NetWare

next-gen firewall

Hyphenate “next-gen” when followed by a noun

ongoing

online

Not on-line

onsite

OpenVMS

OS/2

outbox

Outlook

Outlook Express

Partner

  • Example: Sophos Partner
  • Our partners (only when using Sophos before partner)

PC

PDF

peer-to-peer

Plc

For Sophos; most other companies use plc or PLC - use their preference

plugin

popup

Use as one word

  • Example: A popup window opens

practice

Noun in U.K.; noun and verb in U.S.

practise

Verb in U.K.

predefine

pre-empt

proactive

pull-down

Noun and adjective

PureMessage

real-time

Adjective; otherwise real time

  • Example: A real-time transaction. He updated it in real time.

re-enter

registry

removable

re-read

right-hand

Adjective; not right hand

rollout

scalable

screensaver

smartphone

smartcard

Sophos Antivirus

Not Sophos Anti-Virus or SAV

SPARC

Not Sparc

spear phishing

standalone

Adjective; when used after a verb, stand alone is two words

  • Example: A standalone computer; they stand alone.

SMTP

spam

No caps

startup

strapline

Not strap line

SUSE

system requirements

Use this phrase when referring to software. If referring to hardware use “technical specifications.”

technical specifications

Use this phrase when referring to hardware. If referring to software use “system requirements.”

troubleshoot

One word

whitepaper

One word