Sophos RED Wins Protector at Annual Australian Information Security Awards

May 24, 2013 Sophos Press Release

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – May 24, 2013 – Sophos is pleased to announce that its Sophos RED product has won the "Protector Award" at the 2013 Australian Information Security Awards.

The awards, which recognize outstanding work in the computer security industry, are run jointly by AusCERT and Secure Computing Magazine.

The judging panel of Australian security experts was asked to pick the product that does the most to keep organizations up and running in the face of attacks such as DDoSes and zero-days.

DDoSes are distributed denial of service attacks - where attackers bombard networks with bandwidth-sapping traffic from thousands or millions of drone computers. They are often considered the most difficult of attacks to resist.

Zero-days are attacks based on software bugs for which no patch is available. They are often considered the most pernicious sort of attack, because they test the effectiveness of proactive protection.

"We are honored to win this award, as it demonstrates the breadth of our network offerings," said Ashley Wearne, General Manager for Sophos Australia and New Zealand. "We secure an organization’s entire network, including remote offices and virtual workforces, against attacks that go beyond the remit of a traditional anti-virus."

The Sophos RED (Remote Ethernet Device) protects remote sites such as branch offices, providing secure remote access over an encrypted VPN (Virtual Private Network), quickly and easily.

At headquarters, an IT admin can just type in the unique ID printed on the RED and then simply plug in the device at a remote site or home office and turn it on. That's it. The RED and Sophos' cloud-based Provisioning Service does the rest, automatically and securely bringing remote sites online.

As Wearne points out, many remote office security solutions fall down at the last hurdle—installation and configuration by non-technical staff at the remote site. "The RED is a true zero-configuration device," he said. "You can't press the wrong button because there aren't any. That doesn't only make it cheaper to deploy, it means that it 'Just Works'."