New podcast discusses the evolution of Network Access Control

October 16, 2008 Sophos Press Release

Carole Theriault
Sophos's Carole Theriault interviews NAC product specialist Scott Lewis.

IT security and control firm Sophos, today announced the availability of a new podcast which explores the development of Network Access Control (NAC) into a more sophisticated authentication tool.

Scott Lewis, NAC product specialist, is interviewed by Carole Theriault about the adoption rate of the technology and whether new NAC offerings are cost-effective for organizations.

In the podcast entitled "The evolution of NAC", Lewis explains that earlier versions of NAC were focused on blocking unknown users, with many hardware offerings requiring changes to the IT infrastructure, adding to the management burden.

"The industry's first NAC implementations offered policy enforcement - if you did not meet the policy requirements, you were not allowed onto the network. While this approach safeguarded the network, it certainly did not help productivity," said Carole Theriault, host of the Sophos podcasts. "Today's leading NAC solutions assess what is out of kilter on a computer in terms of the company's policies, and self-remediate automatically, updating all software or installing any patches for instance. The end-user can get on the network safely without ever getting the administrator involved."

Lewis explores how new NAC offerings are moving up the value chain to address and enable IT best practices.

"The fear of data breaches and the need to comply with mandatory guidelines are fuelling the need for organizations to ensure their confidential information is secure," continued Theriault. "This new NAC model provides administrators with visibility into the real health of their network and even produce reports which can be given to auditors, saving time and resource."

All Sophos podcasts are available for download at www.sophos.com/podcasts. Previous podcasts have covered topics such as phishing, Microsoft Windows Vista, corporate security policies, SQL injection attacks, Facebook, and rootkits.