Best Buy digital photo frames ship with computer virus

January 24, 2008 Sophos Press Release

Experts at SophosLabs™, Sophos's global network of virus, spyware and spam analysis centers, have reminded users of the importance of computer security following the disclosure that digital photo frames sold in the holiday season carried a virus.

Insignia NS-DPF10A digital photo frames, which connect to PCs via USB, were "contaminated with a computer virus during the manufacturing process" according to a notice posted on the company's website.

Insignia published information about the infected products on its website
Insignia published information about the infected products on its website.

Retail giant Best Buy is the exclusive vendor of Insignia products, and has said it is trying to contact customers who have purchased the 10.4 inch picture frames.

"The good news is that the virus which has made its way onto some of the digital photo frames has been around for some years, and just about every anti-virus product should have no difficulties in intercepting the infection," said Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant for Sophos. "From that point of view, Best Buy is lucky, and things could have been a lot worse. Their challenge now is getting a message to the many people who may have purchased the frames in the run-up to the holidays and may not have the right protection in place. Technology producers need to not lose sight of data security, and be careful that malware doesn't creep onto their devices at manufacture."

Other consumer gadgets to have been affected by virus infections in the past include the TomTom satellite navigation device and Apple Video iPods. In 2006, the Japanese subsidiary of McDonald's recalled 10,000 MP3 players after discovering that they had been infected by a spyware Trojan horse.

Sophos experts note that the virus infection on the digital photo frame only affects Windows computers, not devices running Mac OS X or Linux.