Sophos protects WWF from computer viruses in the wild

November 21, 2002 Sophos Press Release

WWF Australia and South Pacific select Sophos for anti-virus protection

WWF

Sophos, a world leader in corporate anti-virus protection today announced that the Australia and Pacific regions of WWF (formerly known as the World Wide Fund for Nature) have each contracted for more than 100 licences of Sophos Anti-Virus to protect their computer systems against the threat of computer viruses.

WWF Australia will deploy Sophos Anti-Virus across its headquarters in Sydney and branch offices in Melbourne, Canberra, Darwin, Brisbane and Perth to replace an assortment of five other anti-virus products, while WWF South Pacific's deployments will be in Fiji, Papua New Guinea, The Solomon Islands and The Cook Islands.

"WWF has offices throughout Australia and Sophos offers a comprehensive anti-virus solution which is flexible enough to suit the varying demands and capacities of our geographically diverse locations," said Tomi Strugar, IT Manager with WWF Australia.

"Our computer networks hold vital information about environmental research and endangered species, and policy documents and confidential membership details. WWF recognises that a reliable anti-virus package is a crucial part of our total security policy framework," Strugar continued.

Atin Khatri, IT administrator for WWF South Pacific agreed, saying, "From an administrator's perspective, Sophos is the best anti-virus software on the market, not least because of its simplicity and manageability."

WWF's technology steering group selected Sophos Anti-Virus to enable the Australian and the South Pacific offices to more easily manage their networks and reduce time consuming activities through centralised administration in each region. In addition, with automated and centralised management of Sophos Anti-Virus, WWF can be assured that the implementation and associated licencing will always be kept up-to-date.

WWF is a highly respected organisation at the forefront of conserving biodiversity world-wide, with 200 offices in 40 countries. Australia and South Pacific are the latest regions in a global agreement under which Sophos provides anti-virus protection for WWF.

"Sophos will protect WWF from computer viruses and other destructive malware, so that it can concentrate on protecting living species in the world around us," said Stuart Palmer, managing director at Sophos Anti-Virus Australia and New Zealand. "With high profile viruses such as BugBear and the threat of viruses in the wild showing no sign of slowing, it is essential for any business or organisation to have a security policy in place that combines anti-virus software with safe computing practices."