Sophos shows Minister how to minimise virus risk

April 05, 2001 Sophos Press Release

Government Minister visits HQ of global anti-virus firm to receive advice on safe computing and the needs of hi-tech businesses

Mark Forrest, Director of Sales and Marketing at Sophos, greets Paddy Tipping MP Mark Forrest, Director of Sales and Marketing at Sophos, greets Paddy Tipping MP

Paddy Tipping, Parliamentary Secretary to the Privy Council Office, today visited the Abingdon HQ of Sophos Anti-Virus, a world leader in corporate anti-virus protection. The minister used the visit to discuss the needs of fast-growing, hi-tech businesses such as Sophos and to benefit from advice on how organisations can protect against computer viruses.

In his role in the Government's Business Coordination Unit, Mr Tipping regularly visits both small and large businesses to discuss their needs and what they feel is required from the Government. As part of the Government's initiative for all UK businesses to be online by 2005, Mr Tipping is keen to listen to the viewpoints of organisations such as Sophos.

"Sophos is an example of a great British IT company," said Mr Tipping. "We strongly believe that the UK is capable of becoming a leading hi-tech economy and by listening to companies like Sophos we hope to put in place the necessary policies to support the growth of this exciting industry sector."

Sophos Anti-Virus is a highly successful UK company based in Abingdon, Oxfordshire. It employs over 170 people at its HQ and more than 50 further staff at its offices in France, Germany, the US, Japan and Australia. The company is expanding rapidly and is extending its Abingdon site to house more than 200 new employees, which the company plans to recruit over the next two years. Sophos Anti-Virus protects more than 65% of the top 100 companies in the FT500 listing.

"It's encouraging to know that the Government is taking the security threat seriously," said Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at Sophos Anti-Virus. "As more companies go online and more businesses become dependent on computers for core activities, it's crucial that the safe computing message is hammered home."