Sophos promotes safe computing for Australian educational institutions

February 15, 2000 Sophos Press Release

Schools, colleges & universities to benefit from special education pricing scheme

SYDNEY - Sophos, world leader in networked anti-virus solutions, believes you are never too young to practise safe computing.

To this end, it has launched an Australia-wide scheme aimed at delivering and supporting extremely cost-effective anti-virus software solutions for schools, colleges and universities. The flexible scheme involves one-, two- and three-year educational licences covering:

  • Multiples of up to 250 PCs or Apple Macintosh systems (primary and secondary schools)
  • Multiples of up to 1000 PCs or Macs (secondary and technical colleges)
  • Unlimited usage (for universities and other large educational institutions).

The scheme can also be extended to include all educational facility staff (at work and home) and students at home who need to access central systems and databases, or email assignments and classwork into participating institutions.

"Our plan is to provide the world's best networked anti-virus software at prices all educational facilities can afford," Sophos's Australian Education Sales Manager, Derek Conibear, says. "Sophos Anti Virus software will be loaded onto all email and file servers in an effort to make all computing and communication as virus-free as possible."

Sophos's Australian move follows the successful launch of the scheme last year in the UK.

"Schools, colleges and universities in that country are taking up our offer with gusto," Conibear says. "Our biggest educational customer to date is the UK's Open University, with 200,000 users -- almost 25,000 of them outside the country.

"The Open University had previously used the Dr Solomon's anti-virus software, but switched because of Sophos's extremely competitive pricing, and because of deteriorating levels of service and support following Network Associates International's (McAfee) buy-out of Dr Solomon's."

Sophos is currently embarked on a direct marketing campaign aimed at converting and protecting Australian educational facilities.